How The Feds Will Use Wi-Fiber To Create A National Public Surveillance Network: Part 2

MassPrivateI
by MassPrivateI

 

surveillance

Since 9/11, the Feds have been hard at work trying to create a national surveillance network ‘for our safety.’ And with Wi-Fiber Technology they might have finally succeeded. A new study by Safety.com revealed that CCTV cameras record every American at least 238 times a week, or more than 12,000 times every year!

Approximately 6 years ago the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) created a national license plate reader program which was allegedly cancelled after public outcry.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson on Wednesday ordered the cancellation of a plan by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency to develop a national license-plate tracking system after privacy advocates raised concern about the initiative.” 

An important tidbit, that has been mostly ignored by the mass media, is law enforcement’s involvement in helping create the DEA’s national license plate reader program.

In 2015 I wrote an article exposing law enforcement’s role in funneling license plate to the Feds.

“The DEA has gathered as many as 343 million records in the National License Plate Recognition program, which connects DEA license plate readers with those of other law enforcement agencies around the country.”

From repo companies to license plate reader companies like Rekor Systems, Vigilant Solutions and Flock Safety a vast database of more than 14 billion license plates have been recorded. 

Even Homeland Security’s, Customs and Border Protection are recording American’s license plates.

At the same time, police departments have been expanding their cam-share programs throughout the country. Police cam-share programs give law enforcement unfettered access to public and private CCTV cameras

Our cities have become world leaders in public surveillance as a result of the many surveillance cameras in America.  Readers should note that since the pandemic, Americans have seen a proliferation of facial recognition/thermal imaging cameras spreading across the country. 

While all of this has been going on, the Feds have been hard at work turning our cities into mini-CIA smart cities. 

In 2017, the CIA’s “Signature School”, the University of New Mexico, has been helping turn our cities into smart cities. Not to be outdone, the U.S. Marine Corps also has their dirty hands in smart cities.

Last year, the U.S. Marine Corps signed a memorandum of understanding to work with the city of San Diego in turning street lights and the IoT into smart city surveillance devices.  

I have written extensively about how cities like San Diego and Detroit have become mirror images of Chinese-Style surveillance networks. Both San Diego and Detroit use smart street lights equipped with an array of sensors that record pedestrians, vehicles and in some cases are equipped with microphones.

In San Diego’s case, smart streetlight’s are being used to create a public watchlisting network, which brings us to Wi-Fiber.  With Wi-Fiber, Big Brother now has the necessary tool to connect a hodgepodge of separate police surveillance networks into one cohesive public surveillance network.

In part 1, I mentioned how Wi-Fiber allows police to secretly monitor protesters “at a distance for a less visible police presence,” and it allows law enforcement to secretly follow vehicles as they travel throughout the city of Canton, Ohio. Part 1 also revealed how law enforcement can use Wi-Fiber to identify and track pedestrians and any items or clothing they may be carrying or wearing, which really only touches the surface of just how invasive police surveillance has become.

Wi-Fiber gives law enforcement access to public and private CCTV cameras, cam-share cameras, public transit cameras, red-light cameras, traffic intersection cameras, highway surveillance cameras, E-ZPass cameras, ShotSpotter cameras (with microphones), smart street lights and license plate readers to track Americans without a warrant. To see how police turned the “Electronic Monitoring Indigency Fund” into a highway surveillance program, click here.)

Wi-Fiber will allow police and Fusion Centers to tie all of these surveillance devices into one network, giving them the ability to secretly track Americans and vehicles without a warrant. It allows police to create secret red-flag or detection zones that record and monitor people, objects or vehicles entering or exiting a zone in real-time. 

Wi-Fiber also allows law enforcement to look at historical records and track a person[s] or vehicle[s] whereabouts thus making Wi-Fiber a hugely intrusive tool used to monitor anyone, for any reason.

Thanks to products like Wi-Fiber, Americans can see how these so-called public safety devices are all designed with one commonality: to create a national public surveillance network. 

What does the future hold for Wi-Fiber and freedom in America? 

Last month, newspapers from across the country posted BlueLeak information that revealed a secret national citizen spying program, using TLO’s to report people to Fusion Centers for doing innocent things like, taking photos of a theatre or refusing to identify themselves. DHS’s “If You See Something Say Something” program has morphed into a vast network of 500 police snitching apps and social media platforms like “Nextdoor” that turn neighbors into government snitches.

For those skeptics out there, I say, all the warning signs have been there. Time and again privacy advocates like myself have warned the public about Big Brother’s desire to record and track everyone. It was only a matter of time before a company like Wi-Fiber came along and gave law enforcement the ability to tie all these networks into one national public surveillance network.

 

MassPrivateI