Pediatrician: We Don’t Know What Anti-Psychotics Do to Children

Occupy Corporatism
by Susanne Posel

Orig.src.Susanne.Posel.Daily.News- 2171476,h=425,pd=1,w=620

The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital (CCH) commissioned a report that pointed out how the prescriptions for anti-psychotics given to children of preschool age and older have begun to wane in recent years.

From 2005 to 2009, the amount of psychotropic drugs recommended and administered to children who were males and Caucasian showed a rise in prescriptions from 1994 to 2009.

Tanya Froehlich, pediatrician at CCH and lead author of the study said : “The likelihood of receiving a behavioral diagnosis increased in 2006 to 2009, but this was not accompanied by an increased propensity toward psychotropic prescription. In fact, the likelihood of psychotropic use in 2006-2009 was half that of the 1994-1997 period among those with a behavioral diagnosis.”

Participants in the study were 600 children aged 2 to 5 years. The data was provided by the National Ambulatory and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys (NA-NHAMCS).

Data from 1994 to 2009 showed that as diagnosis of behavioral problems in white male children began to rise, so did the use of anti-psychotic medication.

These drugs included:

• Typical and atypical anti-psychotics
• Antidepressants
• Anti-anxiety
• Stimulants
• Mood stabilizers

Froehlich said: “It’s good to get a gauge on what we’re doing with psychotropic medications in this age group, because we really don’t know what these medications do to the developing brain. Furthermore, given the continued use of psychotropic medications in very young children and concerns regarding their effects on the developing brain, future studies on the long-term effects of psychotropic medication use in this age group are essential.”

Shockingly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) provided documentation that confirmed preschool children received a 2 to 3 fold increase in being prescribed psychotropic drugs between 1991 and 2001.

Mark Olfson, clinical psychiatry professor at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) explained: “I think this is an area that has gotten a fair amount of public attention and it could be this is parents and physicians stepping back from a willingness to prescribe these medications. What really is important is that a thorough assessment be conducted before any decision is made about prescribing medications.”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new testing system called Neuropsychiatric EEG-Based Assessment Aid (NEBA) System that measures electrical impulses that neurons give off within the brain to look for evidence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) within a patient’s neural-net.
It is believed that this new device “can help confirm an ADHD diagnosis” or “other medical or behavioral conditions that produce similar symptoms.”

Proof of what these medications do to developing minds is clear.

In many high profile shootings involving children, it comes to light that they were prescribed one of the 22 anti-psychotic drugs that are known to cause:

• Mania
• Hostility
• Violence
• Homicidal ideation

A study published earlier this year claimed that children of minority groups go undiagnosed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) which results in a lack of psychological treatment.
Apparently, researchers have ignored the fact that Leon Eisenberg, the “father of ADHD” who received the Ruane Prize for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Research award in 2009 for his contribution to research in child psychiatry, stated in his last interview before he passed away in 2012 that “ADHD is a prime example of a fictitious disease.”

Paul Morgan, lead author of the study said : “We’re seeing that the disparities occur as early as kindergarten and then remain and continue until the end of eighth grade. It’s a consistent pattern of what we’re interpreting as comparative under-diagnosis for minority populations.”

Paul Morgan, lead author of the study said : “We’re seeing that the disparities occur as early as kindergarten and then remain and continue until the end of eighth grade. It’s a consistent pattern of what we’re interpreting as comparative under-diagnosis for minority populations.”

Previous studies claimed that African American children were recorded as displaying more tendencies and symptoms, yet would not be diagnosed and receive treatment.

Because of this trend, researchers asked whether or not ADHD was being confused for another condition or simply being written off as socio-economic and/or cultural differences.

Morgan states: “What that suggests in our study is that there are children who are likely deserving of a diagnosis, but who aren’t receiving a diagnosis, which raises the question of a lack of treatment.”

Via Occupy Corporatism